Blind cricket was invented in Melbourne in 1922 with the world's first sports ground and clubhouse for blind people developed at Kooyong, Melbourne in 1928. The venue at Kooyong is still used today as the home of the VBCA. The game of blind cricket is a version of the game which has been adapted so that it can be played by blind and partially sighted players.

The pitch is made of concrete and measures the same length and width as used in sighted cricket. The boundaries are measured 40 metres in a circle around the pitch and indicated by a white line with orange witches hats at intervals. The current ball used is made of white plastic with metal washers inside to give the ball an audible sound when bowled or thrown.

The VBCA provides an important role in the community by developing and providing opportunities for people who are blind or vision impaired to enjoy the recreational and social benefits of cricket. Additionally, the VBCA participates in cricket matches against sighted opposition in keeping with the philosophy of integration and working to remove barriers and isolating influences of having limited vision.

Rules & Equipment

Field 

Blind Cricket is played on a concrete pitch and is the same a length and width as used in sighted cricket. The Boundaries are measured 40 metres in a circle around the pitch and indicated by a white line with orange witches hats at intervals.

Ball

The current ball used is made of white plastic with metal washers inside to give the ball an audible sound when bowled or thrown.

Equipment 

Standard cricket gear is used otherwise by all players, this includes a bat, helmets, pads and gloves. Furthermore, wicket keepers will have a set of gloves and wicket keeping pads along with their other gear.

Classifications

Who is eligible to compete?

Blind cricket is played by three categories:

[ B1 ] No light perception in either eye up to and including light perception but inability to recognize the shape of a hand at any distance or in any direction.

[ B2 ] From ability to recognize the shape of a hand up to and including visual acuity of 2/60 and/or visual field of 5 degrees or less.

[ B3 ] From visual acuity above 2/60 up to and including visual acuity of 6/60 and/or a visual field of more than 5 degrees up to and including 20 degrees.

All classifications in best eye with best correction.

Pathways

Contacting your local Member State Blind Cricket Organisation to find out if there are any local Blind Cricket teams to you is the best way to find out if there is a suitable pathway close to you.

Contact Information 

Tony Sutton, Secretary 

[email protected] 

Blind Cricket Australia Website 

https://www.blindcricket.org.au/contact-us.html

Further Information 

Blind Cricket South Australia - http://www.blindcricketsa.org/

Blind Cricket Victoria - http://www.vbca.org.au/

Blind Cricket New South Wales - http://www.blindcricket.com/

Cricket Tasmania - https://www.crickettas.com.au/

Blind Cricket ACT - https://www.facebook.com/blindcricketactofficial/

Blind Cricket Queensland - http://www.qbca.org.au/

Blind Cricket Western Australia - https://www.facebook.com/West-Australian-Blind-Cricket-Club-The-Venetians-1374441959461945/